Computers and back dating

Drawing on its pioneering SCAMP (Special Computer, APL Machine Portable) prototype of 1973, IBM's General Systems Division announced the IBM 5100 Portable Computer in September 1975.Weighing approximately 50 pounds, the 5100 desktop computer was comparable to the IBM 1130 in storage capacity and performance but almost as small and easy to use as an IBM Selectric Typewriter.So they shopped for completely functioning and pretested subassemblies, put them together and tested the final product. They went to outside vendors for most of the parts, went to outside software developers for the operating system and application software, and acted as an independent business unit.Those tactics enabled them to develop and announce the IBM PC in 12 months -- at that time faster than any other hardware product in IBM's history.

Estridge decided early that to be successful and to meet deadlines, the group had to stick to the plan: using tested vendor technology; a standardized, one-model product; open architecture; and outside sales channels for quick consumer market saturation.

One analyst was quoted as saying that "IBM bringing out a personal computer would be like teaching an elephant to tap dance." During a meeting with top executives in New York, Lowe claimed his group could develop a small, new computer within a year. Come back in two weeks with a proposal." Lowe picked a group of 12 strategists who worked around the clock to hammer out a plan for hardware, software, manufacturing setup and sales strategy.

It was so well-conceived that the basic strategy remained unaltered throughout the product cycle.

It also included such advanced functions for the times as a numeric keypad and 10 special keys that enabled users to write and edit text, figure accounts and store data.

Options included: Needing new channels to distribute these new computers, IBM turned to Computer Land; Sears, Roebuck and Co.; and IBM Product Centers to make the IBM PC available to the broadest set of customers. One dealer had 22 customers come in and put down

Estridge decided early that to be successful and to meet deadlines, the group had to stick to the plan: using tested vendor technology; a standardized, one-model product; open architecture; and outside sales channels for quick consumer market saturation.

One analyst was quoted as saying that "IBM bringing out a personal computer would be like teaching an elephant to tap dance." During a meeting with top executives in New York, Lowe claimed his group could develop a small, new computer within a year. Come back in two weeks with a proposal." Lowe picked a group of 12 strategists who worked around the clock to hammer out a plan for hardware, software, manufacturing setup and sales strategy.

It was so well-conceived that the basic strategy remained unaltered throughout the product cycle.

It also included such advanced functions for the times as a numeric keypad and 10 special keys that enabled users to write and edit text, figure accounts and store data.

Options included: Needing new channels to distribute these new computers, IBM turned to Computer Land; Sears, Roebuck and Co.; and IBM Product Centers to make the IBM PC available to the broadest set of customers. One dealer had 22 customers come in and put down $1,000 deposits on the machines for which he could not promise a delivery date.

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Estridge decided early that to be successful and to meet deadlines, the group had to stick to the plan: using tested vendor technology; a standardized, one-model product; open architecture; and outside sales channels for quick consumer market saturation.One analyst was quoted as saying that "IBM bringing out a personal computer would be like teaching an elephant to tap dance." During a meeting with top executives in New York, Lowe claimed his group could develop a small, new computer within a year. Come back in two weeks with a proposal." Lowe picked a group of 12 strategists who worked around the clock to hammer out a plan for hardware, software, manufacturing setup and sales strategy.It was so well-conceived that the basic strategy remained unaltered throughout the product cycle.It also included such advanced functions for the times as a numeric keypad and 10 special keys that enabled users to write and edit text, figure accounts and store data.Options included: Needing new channels to distribute these new computers, IBM turned to Computer Land; Sears, Roebuck and Co.; and IBM Product Centers to make the IBM PC available to the broadest set of customers. One dealer had 22 customers come in and put down $1,000 deposits on the machines for which he could not promise a delivery date.

,000 deposits on the machines for which he could not promise a delivery date.

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